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Separation hedges: opt for sharp or free hedges

Separation hedges: opt for sharp or free hedges

To fence off a garden or a plot of land, the right reflex is to plant a hedge from one or more species of shrubs, favoring if possible the natural species that grow in the region. Thanks to the microclimatic effects (shelter from the wind, absorption of rainwater, soil protection), the hedge fulfills a very important ecological role. It also contributes to shelter a great diversity of animal species, birds, small mammals (rodents), reptiles, but also pollinating insects or predators of other insects (natural biological control), without forgetting snails, earthworms and various destructive microorganisms organic matter. Discover our selection of shrubs for your separation hedges.

Judas tree


Claire Schutz-Croué The Judas tree can be planted as a hedge, alone or in combination with other species, provided that it is pruned regularly after flowering.

Judas tree


Claire Schutz-Croué The Judas tree flowers from March to May. It is planted in spring, autumn and winter (excluding frost). Learn more about the Judas tree here

Photinia


Claire Schutz-Croué Photinia Red Robin is appreciated for the emergence of its red leaves in spring, contrasting with the dark green of the adult leaves. Its delicate flowering and colorful fruits make it an interesting shrub in all seasons.

Photinia


Claire Schutz-Croué The Photinia Red Robin flowers in April and May. It is planted in spring, autumn and winter (frost-free). Learn more about Photinia Red Robin here

Laurustinus


Claire Schutz-Croué The laurel-tin is used as an ornamental shrub or in a living hedge, because of its long winter flowering and its persistent foliage.

Laurustinus


Claire Schutz-Croué The laurel-tin flowers from November to March. It is planted in spring, autumn and winter (frost-free). Learn more about the laurel here

Charm


Claire Schutz-Croué The common charm is mainly used to create hedges for fencing or decoration, these are the hornbeams. It can also be associated with species like charcoals or laurels to create a happy diversity in the colors of foliage. The common charm blooms in April and May. It is planted in spring, autumn and winter (frost-free). Learn more about the common charm here

Griselinia


Claire Schutz-Croué The Grisélinia is attractive by the lustrous aspect of its apple-green foliage, similar in all seasons. It is a remarkable shrub for hedges by the sea because it resists spray. Grisélinia flowers in May and June. It is planted in spring, autumn and winter (frost-free). Learn more about Grisélinia here

Elaeagnus x ebbingei


Claire Schutz-Croué The Elaeagnus x ebbingei is an interesting shrub to create a free or trimmed hedge, alone or mixed with other species. Its discreet autumn flowering perfumes the gardens.

Elaeagnus x ebbingei


Claire Schutz-Croué The Elaeagnus x ebbingei flowers from September to December. This shrub is planted in spring, autumn and winter (frost-free). Learn more about the Elaeagnus x ebbingei here

Abelia with large flowers


Claire Schutz-Croué The Abelia with large flowers is an ideal component of flowering hedges. Its long flowering is romantic and brings light to the garden in the fall. It runs from July to October. The large-flowered Abelia is planted in spring, autumn and winter (frost-free). Find out more about the Large-flowered Abelia here

Japanese charcoal


Claire Schutz-Croué Japanese charcoal is a shrub of major importance for trimmed hedges, remarkable for its shiny foliage and pretty autumn fruits. We should not forget the interest of the many variegated varieties.

Japanese charcoal


Claire Schutz-Croué Japanese charcoal flowers in June and July. It is planted in spring, autumn and winter (frost free). Learn more about Japanese charcoal here